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African American History “February”

Black History

Now You Know

 On February 13: Feb. 13, 1923 – The first black professional basketball team, “The Renaissance,” was organized. Feb. 13, 1957 – Southern Christian Leadership Conference organized at New Orleans meeting with Martin Luther King Jr. as president. Feb 13, 1970 – The New York Stock Exchange admits its first black member, Joseph Searles.

On February 14: Feb. 14, 1817 – Frederick Douglass, “The Great Emancipator,” is born. Feb. 14, 1867 – Morehouse College organized in Augusta, Ga. The institution was later moved to Atlanta. New registration law in Tennessee abolished racial distinctions in voting. Feb. 14, 1936 – National Negro Congress organized at Chicago meeting attended by 817 delegates representing more than 500 organizations.

On February 15: Feb. 15, 1848 – Sarah Roberts barred from white school in Boston. Her father, Benjamin Roberts, filed the first school integration suit on her behalf.  Feb. 15, 1851 – Black abolitionists invaded a Boston courtroom and rescued a fugitive slave. Feb. 15, 1968 – Henry Lewis becomes the first black to lead a symphony orchestra in the United States. which sells 800,000 copies for Columbia Records.

On February 15: Feb. 15, 1848 – Sarah Roberts barred from white school in Boston. Her father, Benjamin Roberts, filed the first school integration suit on her behalf.

Feb. 16, 1951 – New York City Council passes a bill prohibiting racial discrimination in city-assisted housing developments.

Akron’s African American History Timeline

1825 to 1975
“… the teaching of black history and culture not only should seek to save black history and culture and all the good therein, it should involve or integrate the student into his community, augmenting his functioning in the community and, indirectly in society and the world at large.”  ~Nathan Hare~
1830-1860 – The Early Years
1860-1899 – Civil War through Reconstruction Period
1900-1919 – The New Century
1920-1929 – The Third Decade
1930-1939 – The Depression Years
1940-1949 – A Decade of Hope
1950-1959 – A Decade of Change
1960-1975 – Local Responses to National Issues

Source: The Contributions of Blacks in Akron: 1825-1895
A Doctoral Dissertation by Shirla Robinson McClain

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